about RAYMOND GONZALEZ

SSgt Raymond Gonzalez (USAF-SEP) has worked the streets of New York City as an Emergency Medical Technician, chased bad guys with the New York City Housing Police Department and explored the world as a Flight Medic with the United States Air Force. After serving his country, he pursued his entrepreneurial goals owning car dealerships in the Saint Louis Metro East, Southern IL region.

He lives in Plymouth, MA, has worked remotely for Shop.com deploying eCommerce enabled websites and social media solutions for small businesses and recently stood up the Business Development Center for Honda of Plymouth.

Currently he is the Massachusetts Veteran Program Coordinator for Vantage Mobility International and founder of the American Wheelchair Van Society connecting disabled warriors with State, Federal and Private funding for the purchase of specially adapted wheelchair vans in Boston, MA. His work has afforded the heroes of Massachusetts the independence and mobility they deserve.

Insect spy drones? Robotic Flying Mosquitos? Big brother stuff or…?

What the…

Is this a mosquito? No. It’s an insect spy drone for urban areas, already in production, funded by the US Government.

It can be remotely controlled and is equipped with a camera and a microphone. It can land on you, and it may have the potential to take a DNA sample or leave RFID tracking nanotechnology on your skin. It can fly through an open window, or it can attach to your clothing until you take it in your home. Given their propensity to request macro-sized drones for surveillance, one is left with little doubt that police and military may look into these gadgets next.

And for all you who automatically say “fake”… do some research!

Source: http://is.gd/Uy5DJT
Actual research paper: http://is.gd/1UcubI
Actual footage: http://is.gd/wYN00X
Another source: http://is.gd/0sVVAS
And another: http://is.gd/u5DC9s
Patent: (cut and paste)
http://www.google.com/patents?id=ql4FAAAAEBAJ&pg=PA1&dq=flying+insect+drone&hl=en&sa=X&ei=K4TcT6SdFIGc9gTq5_XRCg&ved=0CD0Q6AEwAg#v=onepage&q&f=false

~ United States of Anonymous

Reposted from: Recall every Congressman who voted for the NDAA

Texas College Hacks and Flies Dept. of Homeland Security Drone

http://raymondgonzalez.com

Chime in, thoughts?

EPC RFID Tag with permission of SMARTCODE Corp...


Source: raymondgonzalez.com
This garage door reads:
3 Tours in Iraq but no bailout for people like me.

Thoughts?

This garage door reads:
3 Tours in Iraq but no bailout for people like me.

Thoughts?

Middleborough, MA - $25 fine for swearing (cursing). Chime in, thoughts?

MIDDLEBOROUGH, Mass. — Residents in Middleborough voted Monday night to make the foul-mouthed pay fines for swearing in public.

At a town meeting, residents voted 183-50 to approve a proposal from the police chief to impose a $20 fine on public profanity.

Middleborough Police Chief Bruce Gates discussed his town's proposed $20 fine for public profanity with WBZ-TV.

Middleborough Police Chief Bruce Gates discussed his town’s proposed $20 fine for public profanity with WBZ-TV.

Officials insist the proposal was not intended to censor casual or private conversations, but instead to crack down on loud, profanity-laden language used by teens and other young people in the downtown area and public parks.

I’m really happy about it,” Mimi Duphily, a store owner and former town selectwoman, said after the vote. “I’m sure there’s going to be some fallout, but I think what we did was necessary.”

Duphily, who runs an auto parts store, is among the downtown merchants who wanted take a stand against the kind of swearing that can make customers uncomfortable.

"They’ll sit on the bench and yell back and forth to each other with the foulest language. It’s just so inappropriate," she said.

The measure could raise questions about First Amendment rights, but state law does allow towns to enforce local laws that give police the power to arrest anyone who “addresses another person with profane or obscene language” in a public place.

Matthew Segal, legal director for the American Civil Liberties Union of Massachusetts, said the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that the government cannot prohibit public speech just because it contains profanity.

The ordinance gives police discretion over whether to ticket someone if they believe the cursing ban has been violated.

Middleborough, a town of about 20,000 residents perhaps best known for its rich cranberry bogs, has had a bylaw against public profanity since 1968. But because that bylaw essentially makes cursing a crime, it has rarely if ever been enforced, officials said, because it simply would not merit the time and expense to pursue a case through the courts.

The ordinance would decriminalize public profanity, allowing police to write tickets as they would for a traffic violation. It would also decriminalize certain types of disorderly conduct, public drinking and marijuana use, and dumping snow on a roadway.

Segal praised Middleborough for reconsidering its bylaw against public profanity, but said fining people for it isn’t much better.

"Police officers who never enforced the bylaw might be tempted to issue these fines, and people might end up getting fined for constitutionally protected speech," he said.

Another local merchant, Robert Saquet, described himself as “ambivalent” about the no-swearing proposal, likening it to try to enforce a ban on the seven dirty words of George Carlin, a nod to a famous sketch by the late comedian.

"In view of words commonly used in movies and cable TV, it’s kind of hard to define exactly what is obscene," said Paquet, who owns a downtown furniture store.

But Duphily said, “I don’t care what you do in private. It’s in public what bothers me.”

Chime in, thoughts?

original article

http://raymondgonzalez.com 

Source: raymondgonzalez.com
It’s easier to fool people than to convince them that they have been fooled. -Mark Twain.

It’s easier to fool people than to convince them that they have been fooled. -Mark Twain.